March MEDIA TRAINING Madness 2018

By Gerard Braud, CSP, Fellow IEC

Want more than media interview tips?
Want to be a media interview expert?

 

MARCH MEDIA TRAINING MADNESS-3

I’ve gone “mad” with three offers I’ve never made before and may never make again.

Offer #1

Gerard Braud-Media_Interview Tips

Book a class of 4 trainees and the 5th person attends free.
Book a class of 5 trainees and get the 6th person attends free.
Offer good only for March training dates.
Call me at 985-624-9976 for a quote and to check available dates.

 

 

Offer #2Gerard Braud Book Media Interview Tips

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Don’t Talk to the Media Until…
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Offer #3

Gerard Braud Media Interview Expert Special Report

Get your FREE copy of our Special Report
Secrets to the 3 Most Critical Mistakes
Made in Media Interviews

What’s the best piece of advice you were ever given for doing a media interview?

Media training tips can be spread across social media from consultants and public relations professionals. Media interview tips can come from industry professionals, online articles such as PR Daily or PR Newswire, or it may come from your former or current educators.  So, how do you sort through all of the daily influx of information? What is that one tip that was the most memorable and one you think of each time you do a media interview or help your spokesperson through the process of media training?

To help out our corporate communications professionals, and our public relations community, this week’s media relations discussion question is, “What’s the best piece of advice you were ever given for doing a media interview?”

We would love to hear your thoughts this week. Comment here and on our social media pages to join the discussion. Your answers may be featured in our follow-up video!

This question is one of a series of debates in the media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media industries where you and your colleagues can share observations with each other. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite-size bits of best practices. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

Step 3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the follow-up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

What should you do with your hands in a media interview? PR Discussion Question

Should you sit with your hands folded together? If you are standing, should they be clasped as well? Or should you make the appropriate hand gestures as you speak? What could your nonverbals be saying about you during your media interview? It may seem like a simple question, but every minute detail counts when you are doing an interview for the media. Your reputation and revenue are at stake, and you have to be on top of your game to represent your brand.

There is plenty to be discussed on this topic and many corporate spokespeople, CEOs, and subject matter experts could benefit from your expert tips. So, to help out our public relations community, this week’s PR discussion question is, “What should you do with your hands in a media interview?”

We would love to hear your thoughts this week. Comment here and on our social media pages to join the discussion. Your answers may be featured in our follow-up video!

This question is one of a series of debates in the media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media industries where you and your colleagues can share observations with each other. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

Step 3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the follow-up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

Why do they say men should wear makeup in a media interview?

Should men feel uncomfortable about wearing makeup on camera? Could it help them to look more attractive? Could it help them increase their credibility? Or is it just a “Hollywood” custom that isn’t really necessary for men doing a media interview? Have you seen any men whose makeup looked bad in a TV interview? Or men that should have worn makeup but they didn’t? There is plenty to be discussed on this topic and many corporate spokespeople, CEOs, and subject matter experts could benefit from your expert tips. So, to help out our public relations community, this week’s PR discussion question is, “Why do they say men should wear makeup in a media interview?”

We would love to hear your thoughts this week. Comment here and on our social media pages to join the discussion. Your answers may be featured in our follow-up video!

This question is one of a series of debates in the media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media industries where you and your colleagues can share observations with each other. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

Step 3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the follow-up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

What should you do if you are in the middle of a television interview and you know you’ve said something wrong? Tips from PR Experts

Corporate communications professionals, public relations spokespeople, and senior level executives must be trained on how to effectively speak to the media. Media training is crucial for company spokespeople to maintain or improve their organization’s brand, reputation, and revenue. So, why do so many media interviews go so wrong? What can a spokesperson do to correct their mistake? Should they correct it right there on the spot? Or should they do a follow-up interview after consulting with a PR expert?

This week, crisis communications expert Gerard Braud polled social media to ask, “What should you do if you are in the middle of a television interview and you know you’ve said something wrong?” In today’s video, we are featuring tips from our social media followers and crisis communication experts.

We would love to hear your thoughts this week. Comment here and on our social media pages to join the discussion. Your answers may be featured in our follow-up video!

This question is one of a series of debates in the media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media industries where you and your colleagues can share observations with each other. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

Step 3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the follow-up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

How to Keep a CEO From Talking Too Long in a Speech: PR Tips

In this video, crisis expert Gerard Braud shares a follow-up video featuring public relations professional’s answers on the question, “How do you keep your CEO from talking too long in a speech?” He has received answers on social media featuring PR tips and media relations tips. Now he is featuring those tips in this video, with his own expert advice on crisis communications and media training for spokespeople.

As an internal communications or public relations professional, what are some ways that you can help your CEO or executive rehearse and practice to deliver an effective and audience engaging message?

Do you agree with our contributor’s answers? We would love to hear your thoughts this week. Comment here and on our social media pages to join the discussion. Your answers may be featured in a follow-up video like this one!

This question is one of a series of debates in the media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media industries where you and your colleagues can share observations with each other. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the Follow up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

Asking for your PR opinion: What is your best tip for writing great quotes for news releases?

By Gerard Braud –

 

Thumbnail BraudCast

Click image to watch and subscribe to The BraudCast

 

As a corporate writer or public relations professional, capturing the attention of your audience and writing effective news releases, let alone great quotes, is not an easy task.  That is why I am asking you to contribute to our weekly communications and PR discussion questions by sharing your best advice with your colleagues. Each week we seek your best public relations practices on the BraudCast. Your discussion question this week is, “What is your best tip for writing great quotes for news releases?”

As a journalist, a writer, a PR team member, how do you ensure you capture the attention of your audiences using quotes? How do you make sure that the quote doesn’t appear fabricated or written for the spokesperson? How do you make sure it sounds authentic, direct, and even heartfelt?

This question is one of a series of discussion questions about media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices each week. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the Follow up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

Sharing Your Advice on Talking to a Spokesperson After a Bad Media Interview

By Gerard Braud

 

Media Interview Spokesperson Gerard braud

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One messed up media interview can negatively impact your organization’s reputation and revenue. So, how do you, as a public relations professional, address your spokesperson after they have made mistakes in their media interview?

On Monday I asked corporate communicators and media relations professionals for their best advice for this uncomfortable situation. In this follow-up video, I am sharing your comments and best practices you shared on social media.

This question is one of a series of debates in the media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media industries where you and your colleagues can share observations with each other. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the Follow up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.

Maverick Media Training: 3 Secrets to Greater Media Interview Success

By Gerard Braud

Gerard Braud media(Editor’s note: You can learn more about this topic by attending Gerard Braud’s pre-conference session at the IABC World Conference in New Orleans. Register for only $250 today. “Rise to Perfection in Media Interviews” on Sunday, June 5, 2016 from 1:30–4:30 p.m.)

Have you ever put a spokesperson through media training, only to have the interview miss its mark? Have you put a spokesperson through media training only to have the news report turn out less than favorable?

If you answered yes to one or both of these, it is time to adopt maverick media training.

What is maverick media training?

Step one is to recognize the failing point of an interview. Expert analysis tells us bad ad libs are the leading cause of interview failures and news report embarrassment. Yet most media trainers still use the same old technique of giving a spokesperson three key messages, with instructions to ad lib about the key messages. The key messages are usually bullet points or slogan type phrases. They lack the parsing that leads to perfection in word choice.

Maverick media training relies on more preparation by a brilliant writer who can think and write like a reporter. Elements include first writing a strong preamble statement that adds immediate context when spoken. It must explain how your organization serves the greater good of humanity and the primary ways you accomplish this goal. The preamble statement must be written in a conversational tone and must foreshadow the aspects of the organization that the spokesperson is capable of discussing. This should then be followed by a series of paragraphs that simplify complicated issues, adding slightly more detail as you go.

To visualize the writing process, think of it as a large tree, anchored by a solid tree trunk, that supports three solid branches. In maverick media training this is known as the key message tree. The more you grow your tree with well-worded, easy to internalize sentences, the greater likelihood you have that the spokesperson will internalize and use the sentences verbatim, thus replacing bad ad libs with great, quotable content.

Step two is to recognize that a direct answer to a direct question leads to failure. That’s because a direct answer has no context. This mistake is the primary reason spokespeople complain that they were taken out of context.

By using the preamble and key message tree system described in step one, the spokesperson can add context with the preamble and transition from there to answering the essence of the reporter’s question.

If the actions of your organization are always in line with and congruent to your preamble, your interview will always go smoothly. If someone has done something wrong and created a crisis, the preamble can be modified to include an apology for failing to live up to the goals and standards of the organization. The apology can then be followed by an explanation of what corrective actions will be taken to avoid similar failings in the future.

Step three of maverick media training focuses on the final edit. Many people lament that, “You can’t control the edit.” That is false.

If you recognize that every news report has a headline, a synopsis sentence known as a “lead,” and at least one quote from your spokesperson, then you can begin to control the edit.

Maverick media training stresses to the spokesperson the need to begin answers with a series of well-worded, well-written and well-internalized verbatim phrases that mimic the headline, lead, and quote. In essence, the key message tree mimics what reporters call the inverted pyramid. The inverted pyramid focuses on generalities first and adds more details as the news story progresses.

Ultimately, there is a psychology to greater success in a media interview. It involves thinking like, writing like, and speaking like a reporter. If you give a reporter the elements needed to do their job, in the very order and sequence that they need them, your victories in interviews and news report edits will rise exponentially.

If what you have done in media training in the past has failed you and your spokespeople, be a maverick and adopt new media training techniques. Register for this IABC pre-conference session.

Gerard Braud, CSP, Fellow IEC (Jared Bro) is known by many as the crisis communications expert who is able to put a low cost, yet highly effective crisis communications plan in place in just 2 days. As a former reporter, you may have seen him on NBC, CNN, CBS, the BBC or The Weather Channel. It is the mistakes he saw people make daily as he covered the news that lead him to create a system of crisis communications plans and strategies that have served his clients on 5 continents. 

 

Crisis Communication Discussion Question: How Long Should the Plan Be?

By Gerard Braud

This week we are posing a question for corporate communications, public relations, and crisis communications experts. The question is, “How long should a crisis communication plan be?” There are plenty of crisis plans available on the internet. Is a six page crisis management plan long enough to  communicate effectively on your darkest day? How can you tell if a plan is detailed and thorough enough to walk you through the steps of managing your crisis?

Please weigh in and join our weekly discussions by posting here on the blog, on social media or on today’s YouTube video. Later this week I am sharing your expert tips as well as my own opinion in another video. Don’t forget to subscribe to the weekly question on the BraudCast YouTube Channel to participate.

Click here to watch video & Subscribe to the BraudCast

This question is one of a series of discussion questions about media relations, crisis communications, public relations, and social media. Yes, YOU are invited to share your bite size bits of best practices each week. Here is how:

Step 1: Subscribe to The BraudCast on YouTube

Step 2: You will see a short video that poses a new question every Monday. You then post your best practices and observations on The BraudCast YouTube channel.

3: Once your opinion is shared, you can follow the discussion online so you can compare your best practices to those of your professional colleagues.

Step 4: Watch the Follow up Friday Video where you will see a short YouTube video outlining some of the most interesting observations. Yes…your comments may actually show up on our BraudCast video, bringing you world-wide fame, fortune, a big raise, glory, street parades, and more.

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge. Please take 2 seconds now to subscribe to The BraudCast.